Posts Tagged ‘migraines’

So this is a post I would love some feedback on, particularly from others with invisible disabilities.

My last several Krav Maga classes have not gone very well for me, and it has me wondering if I should find a way to speak with instructors about my health issues. In particular because Krav Maga classes have this borderline bootcamp feel. Though so far, when I’ve needed to slow down or even rest I haven’t gotten shit from instructors about it, so that’s good and maybe I’m making something about nothing.

The class before my last one, I had a migraine and was nauseous. I took meds before class and was feeling better, up until I started the class and it came back. So I had to take a lot of rest during the class and half ass a lot because I spent the whole class on the verge of throwing up.

I’ve also been having issues with my last several classes with my asthma due to missing my inhaler/inhaler not working. And part of the problem with my asthma is the symptoms don’t seem bad during activity. I can feel when I start having trouble breathing and need to cut back, but it looks no different than just being a bit out of breathe from working out. I might cough a little bit during an activity, but it’s actually after when it gets bad. If I push through feeling short of breath during activity, triggering an asthma attack, the coughing will progressively get worse for hours after the activity. And if it’s bad, the coughing and trouble breathing will last days. So it’s not noticeable to anyone else at the time, but is a big issue for me.

So I feel like maybe I should take time to explain somehow that due to my invisible illnesses/disabilities, I sometimes have to go slower, or take rests. I haven’t done this before now because… well I hate having to single myself out.

Has anyone else had experience with this?

Advertisements

I love swimming, and I’m realizing one of many reasons that I really enjoy this form of exercise is due to migraines. Since exercise is both a trigger for migraines and makes them a lot worse, they clearly make exercise difficult.

Cold on the other hand is such a godsend for migraines. So swimming in cold water kind of balances it out. Because of having my head immersed in cold water, I don’t get the pain I would with other types of exercise.

As I’ve been doing strength training several days a week before swimming, a lot of the time I am dragging, having trouble doing the strength training because of a migraine. But getting in the pool to swim, I feel better and it doesn’t hold impact my ability to work like it otherwise would.

Of course when I googled I discovered a few people who said that chlorine triggers their  migraines, so it wouldn’t quite work for those folks. Also wouldn’t have the same impact if the water isn’t cold.

But for me, this is another reason to enjoy swimming đŸ™‚

Today I took the afternoon off work (YAY finally having a job with paid time off!) to get some doctor appointments out of the way. Sadly only managed to fit two in- neurology and podiatry.

Neither was particularly exciting. Neurology was more adjusting and changing meds as usual, because my migraines still very frequent. Also my abortive prescription has stopped working for me, so switching to another (that my doctor has to try to convince my insurance to cover by explaining that their preferred medications for me were tried and not effective.)

Podiatry was for my foot pain. Mostly just suggestions to do the things I’ve been doing :-\ (insoles in my shoes, and stretches). But I also got a steroid shot that supposedly will help with the pain temporarily.

But also after my neurology appointment I got a sheet with info on “headache hygiene” with suggestions of things that are supposed to help prevent migraines which included such things as waking up at the same time every day and going to bed at the same time everyday, getting regular exercise, and avoiding skipping meals.

For me personally the one that stood out was not skipping meals. For those who haven’t read posts where I’ve mentioned it before I practice intermittent fasting- so I frequently go 16- 24 hrs without eating anything. I like this method and feel much better with it typically. So I’m curious what the evidence is that fasting will cause migraines, and has me wishing that advice like this came with citations to the research to back it up for patients who want to look into it.

This isn’t specific to just this particular piece of advice but I notice this happens a lot with doctors is that things just generally considered good and healthy become advice for any ailment, regardless of if there is evidence it is actually linked to that ailment. Just like the doctor did on Voyager.

fluids

Photo of the doctor in the television series Star Trek Voyager with the text “Everybody should drink plenty of fluids”. In context Kes, an alien species the Doctor was unfamiliar with, had medical complaints, he told her he had no frame of reference for what she was experiencing but she should drink plenty of fluids. She responded “fluids?” and he states “everybody should drink plenty of fluids”, indicating his advice was not at all specific to her complaints. 

 

It would be nice if doctors had to provide citations just like academics. Instead looks like I’m off to do my own research on this.

So I just discovered reading another blog that June is apparently is Migraine and Headache Awareness Month, and June 29th is apparently specifically set aside for raising awareness of Chronic Migraines. I’m several hours late but still as a chronic migraine sufferer I felt like I should post something myself. Chronic Migraines are defined as having migraines 15 or more days per month. Without medications my migraines are well over 15 days per month, even on preventative I still typically am at about 12-15 days per month.

Headache is also only one of many symptoms of migraines. Others common symptoms include nausea/vomiting, dizziness/vertigo, and fatigue. These symptoms can also change over time as I’ve learned. I’ve had chronic migraines since I was 10, and it was only within the last several years though that I frequently experienced nausea and vomiting with my migraines.

The above infographic that I found points out that depression and anxiety are 2 conditions that people are at an increased risk for with Migraines. Meniere’s Disease is another, which I’ve been diagnosed with as well. As I’ve been told by doctors, they don’t know what the connection between the two is, but there appears to be one as the majority of meniere’s patients have migraines (the alternate is not true though, as most migraine sufferers do not have meniere’s).

As for triggers, besides weather and stress (as noted in the infographic) other common triggers include bright lights, diet (not limited to caffeine), not getting enough sleep, hormonal changes, and exercise. Some of these are fairly well known for being bad when one has a migraine, but many people don’t realize that not only do things like bright lights (florescents especially) and exercise often make migraines worse when you have them, but also can trigger migraines.